Resurrection 33

This is a chapter of the book I am writing for NaNoWriMo. If you want to read it from the start, click here for the chapter index.

Preparation

The alarm on Tab’s iPhone chirped at 5pm, waking him from his nap. He got up, straightened the bed, then went into the bath and shaved the stubble off his face. He had a date tonight. Two if you count the work at the parsonage.

After washing his face he got dressed. Black pants, black lightweight sweater, black jacket, shoes and belt. Even though there was no moon tonight he wanted to be hard to see. He went out to the Buick and opened the trunk. He moved aside the carpet sample packs he used for his cover and retrieved his large duffel of gear underneath. He closed the trunk, want back into his room and laid it on the bed.

He then grabbed a smaller empty duffel from the closet, placing it open on the bed as well.

He chose from the large duffel the pieces of gear he would need tonight.

He pulled out his 9mm Smith and Wesson M&P Shield, holster and the clip. Removing the gun for the holster, he snapped in the clip, pulled back the receiver and chambered a round. He popped out the magazine again and laid the gun on the bed. He took out the box of 9MM +P shells and slid one into the magazine to replace the one he had just chambered. Tab picked up the gun again, sliding the magazine back in. He checked the safety and slid it back into the holster then slid the holster into his waistband at the small of his back. The compact size fit tightly into the small of his back and was comfortable sitting as well as standing.

For years he had carried a .45 ACP STi Lawman, but he switched to the shorter, lighter polymer S&W once he realized its short barrel was surprisingly just as accurate and made for a faster draw. Drawing a gun quickly in a tactical situation was not always easy, and it wasn’t like the movies. In the movies the actors typically used a left handed holster and would draw with their palm facing out.

If you need to draw quickly that makes it harder to get the gun out and positioned in your hand. You can only get a couple fingers behind it. When you pull, it takes extra effort to get your finger to the trigger. You’re also sweeping the gun across your body and it’s easy to shoot yourself.

Tab practiced the “Secret Service Draw” meaning he would draw the gun, palm facing his body, and with one motion release the safety and bring the gun to firing position. Law enforcement officers are trained to bring the gun to firing position before releasing the safety. In Tab’s line of work that gave him an advantage over the cops.

If things got particularly complicated, he had an Australian Bushmaster M17S bullpup under the passenger seat of the Buick.

He left the silencer in the bag.

Next he pulled out the GPS he would need for tonight along with 4 D cell batteries. The unit looked a bit like a matt black Maglight. He unscrewed the end cap and slid in the batteries which automatically made the unit active. Picking up his phone, he opened the app and could see it was registering the location clearly on the map. He removed the batteries again, shutting off the unit, and placed both in the small duffel, along with the box of shells.

He pulled his knife and ankle sheath. Pulling up his pant leg, he strapped it securely.

He selected a wire garrote, a bundle of zip ties and a small flashlight as well, placing them all in the small duffel. He then zipped up both duffels and took the larger one out to the Buick, placing it once again beneath his “samples.”

Going back into The Wayside he did a scan of the room. Assured nothing was out of place, he grabbed the small duffel and went outside. As he locked the door he placed a small scrap of paper in the jam.

He got into the Buick, dropped the duffel on the passenger seat and headed south on 25W. It was 5:40pm.

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2 Comments on “Resurrection 33”

  1. ron877 says:

    In the movies the actors typically used a left handed holster and would draw with their palm facing out.

    If you need to draw quickly that makes it harder to get the gun out and positioned in your hand. You can only get a couple fingers behind it. When you pull, it takes extra effort to get your finger to the trigger. You’re also sweeping the gun across your body and it’s easy to shoot yourself.

    Tab practiced the “Secret Service Draw” meaning he would draw the gun, palm facing his body, and with one motion release the safety and bring the gun to firing position. Law enforcement officers are trained to bring the gun to firing position before releasing the safety. In Tab’s line of work that gave him an advantage over the cops.

    I would be surprised if you did not get a lot of criticism from law enforcement types here. There are many schools of thoughts on the actions taken once you are committed to the “thick of things.” Different agencies, different thoughts. This sounds very complicated to me. A “safety” is never something we used to think about. Basically, once the decision to shoot is made, that decision is made at the point of “draw.” If you draw, you shoot, no further thought. If you shoot, you empty your weapon, reload, and see if anything is still standing. Rinse and repeat. The safety is nowhere considered. I have never seen any training program where I bring the gun to the firing position and then release the safety. Those people will not survive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for reading and for the input, Ron. I actually thought about you when I wrote this chapter and figured you would have some input.

      First, you certainly know more about this than I.

      I got this piece of information from a sheriff’s deputy who was trained at the law enforcement academy at Eastern Kentucky University. But I did not talk to an instructor and that may not be accurate.

      When I start the rewrites in December I’ll double check this piece of information. There are some other factual changes I will want to make, but I may not have double checked this without you taking time to comment. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person


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